Roman Roads

September 17, 2010

In 312 BC a new era began that would affect the world for centuries. That was the year that construction of the Roman Roads began. The paved pathways spanned about 50,000 miles of the Roman Empire: throughout Britain in the west to modern-day Iraq on the east. The roads began in Rome and spilled out in every direction around it. The phrase, “All roads lead to Rome” couldn’t have been more true.

Although the paved paths were created by the government to transport products and military goods, they served a much higher purpose for the Kingdom. The early Christians suffered much persecution from the Romans, but their roads enabled the apostles to travel from country to country, sharing the Good News of Jesus’ life, death and resurrection.

In a similar way, the Internet was created by the military in the 1960’s as a way to create networks and spread information faster and safer. Thirty years later, the World Wide Web was made available to anyone with a computer and a phone line. Today, about a quarter of the earth’s population uses the Internet as a way to find information, connect with people around the world, and share their lives in a new way.

God used the Roman Roads for His will of spreading the gospel. Today, the Lord is using the Internet to draw tens of millions of people into relationship with him. These two pathways, the Roman Roads and the Internet, were created for the benefit of the military. The body of Christ has used them instead to fight battles not of flesh and blood, but spiritual battles.

We will never know how these two human inventions have impacted the world for Christ until we get to heaven and see people from every tongue, tribe and nation kneeling before the throne.cobblestone street in rome

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